The Perfect Shirt | Top 5 Ways to Know if You’re Buying a Luxury Shirt

Today I’m going to give you 5 things that make the difference on a luxury dress shirt. I’ve been running Hawkins & Shepherd for around 6 years now and have acquired a lot of knowledge and experience in the shirt making industry. Here are some things that I look out for immediately when determining the quality of a shirt.

THE COLLAR

The collar on a man’s dress shirt needs to be high quality. The first thing I look for is edge stitching. What is edge stitching? This is a term given when the stitching runs to the edge of the seam It’s harder to do as a tailor because there is less room for error so therefore it takes longer. It’s a technique that takes greater skill.

Most shirts will have quarter edge stitching.

Another thing to look out for on the collar is whether the collar is non-fused. There will be a lining in a collar that is sometimes fused to the fabric on one if not both sides. It’s a cheaper and quicker way to manufacture shirts. Sadly that adhesive used to fuse the collar can perish and react with the fabric over time and washes. You may have recognised a bubbling effect on your collars if you’re buying entry level shirts. To test whether you are buying a quality dress shirt you should be able to pull the fabric away from the lining on both sides. 

Lastly don’t forget about the removable collar stays. Entry level shirts will have them fused in which can be problematic when ironing. Plus ironing over plastic is not desirable and over time will leave nasty indentations on the collar.

STITCHING

Let’s talking about stitching on a dress shirt. Stitching is the most expensive part when it comes to manufacturing. Especially if the shirt is composed using single needle side seam stitching. (Try saying that after one too many Heinekens). A cheaper method of manufacturing is to use the double needle. But single needle leaves a beautiful finish.  

THE SPLIT YOKE  

The all-important split yoke. I’m talking about the block of fabric situated on the back of the shirt that sits over the shoulders. A split yolk means that 2 pieces of fabric lay over the shoulders. It fits better on the shoulders and there is more flow if you have a split yolk. If there is a pattern shirt then it’s more of a design aspect as to whether you chose to have a split yoke.

Personally I like a non-split yoke when its striped or checked. Watch for a split yoke on a lower quality shirt, quite often the patterns will not match up. 

FRONT PLACKET 

I love it clean no stitching. These might come down to personal preferences but there are certain features that will distinguish a luxury dress shirt.

The front placket should without question have mother of pearl buttons mother of pearl buttons, tightly sewn to the placket.

 Every buttonhole should be sewn vertically, apart from the bottom one. This needs to be sewn horizontally which will allow freedom of movement. The bottom button hole will often be the one that sees the most action and needs to flex with the body.  

Talking of movement, look at the gusset of the shirt. A well-constructed shirt will have the triangle area to allow for more movement. It also cleans the hem to a nice finish.

 Some shirts are over engineered with different fabric on the front. I personally don’t see this as a luxury choice. Just extra fuss and a distraction.

The fabric entry level for a luxury shirt will be a  cotton twin 100's. The higher you go up in the yarn count the finer is going to be and more often the softer. Lower yarn count like 40’s, 60’s will be a thicker fabric and not conducive for a dress shirt.

SLEEVES

It’s crucial that the shoulders line up pattern wise with the arms. Again there should be no fused linings in the cuff. I also look for a smaller button on the sleeve placket. I love double button cuff personally, but that it not deemed a feature of luxury, more tradition. If I have a sharp cut in the collar I would also look the same in the cuff, rounded cuffs and collar. 

ICIW Gym wear | Be the Best Dressed in the Gym

Today I'm going to talk to you about ICIW, an athleisure brand out of Stockholm that have sent on a few garments for me to wear to my KOBOX sessions. 

I'm always keen to champion the brands that share the same belief system as I. That have a similar narrative that often includes starting from nothing, taking a leap of faith. 

When I read the backstory of founder Gustaf Ollas and learned how he too switched paths from full time employment and pursued his vision of creating training clothes that he would like to wear. 

Gustaf worked as Personal Trainer and sold dietary training courses online, but knew very little about the textile industry when he began his journey with ICIW in 2012. 

I think at everyone at some point in their lives have ideas on setting up their own tee shirt company right? They get fixated on a theme or slogan, order up about 1000 and then have to deal with boxes of unsold tee shirts clogging up their garage 2 years down the line. 

For anyone that has had any modicum of success in starting up their own brand they'll know the process for producing new garments generally takes between 6-12 months, from idea to prototype and finally to finished product. If you're interested 

It's a tricky business especially as trends and fashion waves move quicker than seasons in today’s current retail climate. ICIW offer high quality training clothes at a competitive price. Most products are manufactured in limited edition to make the customer feel unique.

SOCIAL MEDIA PHENONMENON 

Again, for budding entrepreneurs, take time to familiarise yourself with the ICIW website. It's clean, easy to use, strong imagery and they empower influencers and leverage their social media accounts in very creative ways. 

For example the Hashtag #icaniwill has been used more than 1,600,000 times in writing.

Today, ICIW are a team of seven. A close knit community that provide awesome training apparel and generate positivity and health through the medium of fashion.



Bremont Watches | A Brief History of the Brand

I was fortunate enough to be invited to Henley Regatta last week on behalf of Bremont watches. You can catch that article on the Henley Regatta dress code over on my blog here

The day was truly educational. My first time at the Regatta it's one of those landmark events that makes you feel unashamedly and quintessentially British. 

Bremont is not only a proud sponsor of the Henley Regatta, but also operates a  Parts Manufacturing Facility in a separate location just outside Henley-on-Thames where it is manufacturing case and movement components.

So it's a great homegrown brand. A brand borne out of hardship and tragedy, when the founders and brothers Giles and Nick English suffered a tragic loss. In 1995 their father Euan died and Nick broke over 30 bones following an air-show training incident that Nick had with his father, Euan English.

(I'm going to include the story from the press release here as I can't word it better and it's such a romantic genesis, that I feel it has to be told). 

"The following year after the plane crash, Nick and Giles were back in the air, flying across France in a 60-year-old plane. Bad weather forced them to make an emergency landing in a pea field in the Champagne region.

As fate would have it, the field was owned by an old farmer, who not only reminded the brothers of their own father, but was also a former WWII pilot and just as passionate about aircraft as Nick and Giles.

His farmhouse, where the brothers stayed for a couple of nights, also housed a wonderful selection of restored wall clocks and he wore a particularly special wristwatch, the one given to him by his father. His name, Antoine Bremont, was chosen to grace this range of British watches with his passions in life mirroring closely those of the brothers and their late father.

The brothers were determined to make a watch that would last more than a lifetime. To that end, it had to be made from the best available materials using the most tried and tested techniques.

Indeed, this led to the company’s maxim “Tested Beyond Endurance”; all Bremont timepieces would be tested above and beyond the demands placed upon conventional wristwatches."

It's great to see a British brand invest so much into the local economy, providing jobs and reviving the some would herald, the lost art of British watchmaking. 

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 Passionate about reinvigorating Britain’s horological past, Bremont is wholly dedicated to developing mechanical watch manufacturing expertise in the UK and plans are underway for the opening of a new headquarters bringing together the current manufacturing and assembly under one roof. The 35,000 sq ft building will be a bespoke design built into the Oxfordshire countryside.

Bremont has flagship boutiques in London, New York, Hong Kong and Melbourne with plans for further expansion.

Please take the time to find out more about Bremont and visit their website here

 

 

Men's Dress Code at Henley Regatta | What to wear for Henley Regatta

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What makes Henley Regatta one of the best events in the Summer calendar? This year I was kindly invited to enjoy the frivolities of the festival on behalf of Bremont watches. 

It was my first year at the Henley Royal Regatta. Of course I had first gotten the rowing bug watching the likes of Steve Redgrave and Alex Gregory bring the Olympic Gold home for Great Britain. 

My long distance readers might also be familiar with the scene from The Social Network depicting the oddly brilliant Winklevoss race sequence, filmed here in Henley. 

I finally got to experience my first ever Henley Regatta. Cautious to meet the right dress criteria, I opted for my white Debenhams chino trousers with my stone peak-lapelled linen blend Reiss jacket and a Hawkins & Shepherd formal shirt

You'll find many navy and deckchair striped blazers at the event. Of course if you’re affiliated with a rowing club or rowing school, you’ll be able to wear your school/club blazer and tie.

I adhered to these trends by wearing a burgundy, grey chevron tie, with a pin stripe shirt. The burgundy really off-set the white colours and we were really fortunate with the weather.

The linen jacket was light enough to circulate the heat and of course my Bremont watch finished the all British look. (OK aside from my Tom Ford sunglasses, nearly all-British).  

It's worth noting one of the event sponsors Jeremy Hackett of Hackett London has a word on the dress code on the Henley Regatta site. If you're not attending the Stewards Enclosure there is no dress code, although one is encouraged to enter the spirit of the event with rowing apparel and striped attire

Elsewhere I was in esteemed company with the likes of David Evans from Grey Fox Blog. He looked an absolute picture in the paddock as they say, wearing a striped shirt from Budd Shirtmaker’s, a Navy New and Lingwood jacket and a straw panama from Laird Hatters. 

Influencer and model Alistair Guy plumbed for a blue pinstripe shirt from Eton Shirts. 





 

 

Austin Reed: Progressive Made to Measure Service Goes Door to Door

Austin Reed have unveiled their personal tailoring service, bringing the Made to Measure experience to your home, office, private members club etc. 

I think it's a fantastic move, progressive yet equally clandestine and traditional. Talk to any of the big tailors or shirt makers around today and they'll regale stories of how they would go meet their clients at their place of work or in their hotel etc. 

The legendary Doug Hayward would often meet his clients at The Dorchester and not only measure them, but watch them walk around the room. Study their posture and how they carry themselves. 

Austin Reed are recognising that it's a different world where our attention and time are strained. Not everyone gets lunch hours to nip off to their tailors to get measured. And how good is any experience when it feels frenzied? 

How does it work? 

Together (you and the Austin Reed consultant) will peruse their exclusive selection of luxury fabrics, linings and trims to visualise your bespoke suit.

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Following your first consultation Austin Reed will contact you to arrange a fitting. Final adjustments and any fine-tuning will be completed in a matter of days, with your finished design presented in a versatile Austin Reed travel cover.

Pricing starts from £500, with a made to measure 2-piece suit totalling to approximately £1000. 

My experience was relatively frictionless. I scheduled a consultation and thoroughly enjoyed the process. There is something undeniably empowering about being fitted for a suit on your own terms. I felt like Roger Moore. 

I think we've all been put in situations where we've been persuaded into ill decisions/purchases, perhaps due alien environments. In the sanctuary of my own home I felt much more confident about the process.

CONSULTATION

The Clothier came to my house, I offered him a cup of coffee and some biscuits (not the shortbread) whilst he walked me through the fabric and design options. We discussed football, fashion and of course dogs, whilst I was measured for the suit. Then we had to discuss the style options, such a single vent, turn-up trousers, side-adjusters and what colour buttons - to name a few.

PRODUCTION

After the initial consultation and measuring, the fitting is arranged. Any tweaking or adjustments can also be done through the Austin Reed Made to Measure service which ensures the desired result. 

 

 

Jocks&Nerds Revival: Can Print Magazines go Advertisement-Free?

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Jocks & Nerds returns after a 2-year hiatus. Founder and Editor, Marcus Agerman Ross spoke to one of my contributors Pete Brooker about why he has revived the brand and got his take on the current climate for the print industry. 

Why did we take two years out and what have you learnt in your two year sabbatical?

I was forced to close it down because the business didn’t work anymore. When I realised I had to shut it down I realised I was exhausted, physically and emotionally - aside from the financial pain of it all. I always says there’s only one thing harder than running a business and that’s running a business that’s failing. It’s a horrible place to be.

I started working over 20 years ago and, for better or for worse, I saw what I did as journalism and that journalism was something independent - an important view on the world.

That has all been stripped away before our eyes - I don’t think anyone really understood how it happened or how quickly. (When I started Jocks&Nerds Instagram didn’t even exist and smartphones where a totally new thing!!)

I found myself in a tough situation. Middle-aged with professional experience in only one industry - one that essentially no longer exists. The skills people want today are brand new and I find them really boring.

(I was actually looking at the site of a fairly creative company recently - not for work but for something else - I clicked on their jobs board and all the jobs were things like UX developer, coder, etc!!) I genuinely think it’s very hard to be a creative professional right now. There used to be outlets for creativity that might not have paid so well as the commercial work but all of those avenues are being torn down by the new technology.

I looked for work in places where I thought my skill sets and experience would be really valued but I got nowhere. I also looked at working in totally new sectors but nothing was really coming together.

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In that time, I decided to start a Jocks&Nerds radio show on Soho Radio so that we could keep the name alive and some connection with our audience. I think radio/podcasts are about the only place where you can be journalistic and independent right now. There’s no money in it but there’s essentially no cost either so you can reach people fairly easily and say what you want. It doesn’t tick every box for what I want to say as an editor but it is very useful.

Over that period I kept meeting readers and fans of the mag who told me how much they missed and that there was nothing else out there. I realised that although the advertising had gone, the readership still remained and I started to think how I might be able to put something back together. That was really the start of it.

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The word is there will be no advertising this time around in Jocks & Nerds, how do you expect to finance the publication?

I’m incredibly lucky that I have managed to build an incredible team of contributors around Jocks&Nerds who believe passionately in what we are trying to do and that we stand up for something important that no one else is doing right now. They give up their own time, money and energy to help make it happen.

Now I’m printing the magazine digitally which means I don’t have to print more copies than I can sell. The downside of this the unit cost is really high hence the higher cover price but it is the only way to get it out.

In reality I’ll lose money doing it but I can’t see any other way right now. I value complete control and the ability to do something of value over advertising. Besides, advertisers ultimately destroyed what we were doing in the first place so it’s much better not to have them.

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Were you tempted to completely rebrand?

We already have a recognisable name and we’ve built a sizeable, loyal audience over the best part of a decade so it makes sense to continue as Jocks & Nerds. But we have redesigned the magazine and made a new logo.

This is partly down to the fact that the content is slightly different now and we want people to regard it more as a book or periodical than a magazine - it’s designed to be archival and of value on the bookshelf.

I was lucky that the art director who worked with me at the very beginning, Phil Buckingham, was keen to get involved again. He knows the ethos behind the magazine inside out and knows how to work with me so that was really helpful in this process.

What part of the physical print format did you miss most whilst you were away?

I’ve said this many times recently but I think it’s a really important point. Magazines are in many ways completely anachronistic today whilst also being vitally important. There are issues about them being hugely expensive to produce, difficult to distribute, slow, bad for the environment, etc.

Equally, they are important because no new media format is able to do what magazines do. By that I mean if you think of audio (music, radio, etc) and visual (TV and film) the end user experience isn’t really altered. If anything some things are better. Digital radio is crystal clear and podcasts can be listened to on the go.

But magazines which are edited around a theme, idea or view on the world, that use design as an integral part of the editorial voice, that combine imagery and text in a considered way, that have scale and impact - nothing else exists that can do that - so they are important if those things are valued and I mean that from an editor/journalist point of view.

As I said at the top, the business model is broken so I hope there can be a new way forward with printing costs, distribution, etc and a break-up of the tech oligopolies somewhere down the line. Independent voices like ours are being crushed and I think it will set a dangerous precedent for media going forward.

More of this interview can be found on Pete’s site, Human Research.

 

You can find all available stockists for Jocks&Nerds through their website.

What to Wear to the Goodwood Festival of Speed

The Festival of Speed is a monolithic garden party for petrol heads drawing some of the biggest cars and stars from around the world. 

The event runs from 4th-7th July and 4 day passes being from 159 GBP. If anyone is going please drop me a line, I'm in discussion with a couple of brands and will hopefully be making an appearance. 

In preparation I'm already looking at potential outfits. (What's the cub scout motto?) Here are some suggestions and outfits on what I think you can be wearing to the Festival of Speed. 

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TWEED | DANDY not DAPPER

I'll certainly be donning some tweed, although not the thick tweed you might see in Cheltenham Races. I'm hoping it will be too hot for that typical thick Donegal tweed. 

The difference between the Goodwood Revival and the Festival of Speed is the dress sense is more modern. The baggy Oxford trousers and the thick herringbone tweed look beautiful at the Revival. It is essentially reviving classic looks with heavier fabrics and a fuller cut. 

The Festival of Speed takes that classic look and slots it neatly in a contemporary style. (Yes classic with a modern twist). The cut will be slimmer. The dandyism will still be prevalent but with less windowpane and more cleaner patterns such as herringbone or twill.

See below the difference of a gentleman with a more vintage take for the revival versus the cleaner look of David Gandy photographed for the Festival of Speed on the right. 

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If the weather is really hot (here's hoping) then you might want to have a seersucker suit on standby. 

I'll be no doubt wearing the country shirt from my own collection Hawkins & Shepherd. These button down check shirts will ameliorate the suit from just a conventional look. Styled with a cravat which is celebrated, this will denote to the onlooker that you've put some thought into your outfit. 

It is one of those events worth dressing up for. Without slipping into cosplay, which can be a tricky wire to tread. 

Introducing Sniph: Explore the Scents

Today I'm going to introduce you to a new fragrance company out of Sweden called SNIPH. I flew out to their Headquarters in Stockholm for a couple of days and was introduced officially to the brand.

SO WHAT IS SNIPH? 

In a nutshell it is a monthly fragrance discovery service. They cater for men’s, women’s and unisex perfumes so this is truly something for everyone.

The idea is quite simple. The expert perfumers at SNIPH have already sampled hundreds of artisanal scents from the best boutique perfume studios around the world and keep searching globally to find new niche and exclusive fragrances for you. They then select the ones they think you’ll like best and sort them out in their 6 distinctive collections.

Gradually your selection gets more refined as SNIPH comes accustomed to the scents that you prefer.

Finding a new perfume can be tedious. Sniph is a discovery service for perfume that enables you to try new perfumes. Every month they deliver carefully selected perfumes from exclusive brands in a smart and chic 8ml bottle. With 6 distinctive collections to choose from, you’ll receive a new fragrance that is perfectly tailored to you every month, directly to your door. With no commitments and always free shipping. Basically, they are here to make it simple and fun for you to explore new scents, for you to fall in love with and for any mood or occasion. Perfect for finding your new signature scent, or building a scent wardrobe.

They don't do high-street brands, instead they celebrate uniqueness and are welcoming you into the hidden world of scents to let you enjoy carefully selected perfumes from exclusive brands. Sniph partners with amazing perfume houses worldwide. This means the scents in your subscription may be available in the UK or exclusively available through Sniph.

BUT I LIKE MY OWN FRAGRANCE, WHY WOULD SNIPH WORK FOR ME? 

Firstly, it's always good to mix and match your fragrances. I'm a loyal lover and brand ambassador for Jo Malone London for example, but my shelf is not exclusive to their scents.

By experimenting with different fragrances from SNIPH this enables you to 'explore the world of scents' (to coin their campaign slogan).

You also might like to have some of the heavy lifting taken away from you when it comes to shopping for fragrances. Let someone else with experience select a fragrance for you.

Another thing, that I learned during these days with Sniph in Sweden, is the power of scent. Scent has the power to stir emotions, awaken memories, set moods and captivate the imagination.

Think about it, would you want to smell the same at an important meeting and at a date?

 With this being said a scent wardrobe, where you choose your scent after mood and occasion, is the new way of looking at scent. And to be honest there is a full world out there of amazing scents that would be a shame to miss out on. 

ANY OTHER BENEFITS FOR USING SNIPH? 

Sure, they come in very handy travel vials together with a neat and smart case. Less than 100ml which is also convenient for the bathroom. I know it sounds like woe is me sometimes, but I don't always have the space for all the fragrances on my nightstand or bathroom shelf. (Remember this is London, no walk-in wardrobes here).

They are also really hear to share their love for scent with the world and invite people in to their world. To educate people about the world of scents is one of their missions which means that you will never just receive a random scent with learning about it as well. 

HOW WAS THE TRIP CARL? 

Thanks for asking guys, it was short and sweet but a very interesting and relaxing affair. You may have seen from my stories I enjoyed some yoga sessions at the Djursholm Country Club.

It was a perfect induction into sensory awakening. How often do we close our eyes and listen to what it is we're smelling. 

So much focus is on the visual. Instagram is a proven benefactor of that. Imagine an APP that delivered a scent to your phone. (Jesus that's a great idea, Zuckerberg lets schedule a meeting).

After that we made a flower crown and had some drinks. You know, standard Swedish customs. 

In Sweden they have a Midsummer tradition where you place 7 different flowers under your pillow. You then dream of your one true love.

SNIPH had a neat twist on this tradition and left 7 different fragrances for us to spray on our pillow. I dreamt of ice cream!

I'd like to thank SNIPH for inviting me to Sweden and introducing me to their brand. I had a real sense of community and kinship with the founders and staff. I'll be writing more about SNIPH and the fragrances I receive in later posts.

SNIPH offer subscriptions for 14 GBP a month with free delivery. I am very pleased to be a SNIPH ambassador and all thoughts here are my own. 

DISCOUNT CODE: Use my personalised discount code below which will give you 25% OFF.

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6 of the Best: Fashion YouTubers I’m watching Religiously Right Now

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Today I'm going to give you all a little insight into some of the fashion YouTubers that I've been watching recently. I've not updated my own Vlog in a while as I've been playing a bit of catch up since I've got back from Australasia. 

Of course you're going to know about the heavy hitters for example the Ali Gordon's of the world. I'm going to broaden the landscape and talk more about the up & comers you should be checking out. 

BOND SUITS 

I've enjoyed listening to this one. My friend Pete Brooker and Matt Spaiser from The Suits of James Bond have started a dedicated YouTube channel, a flanker of their podcast From Tailors With Love. It's got humour, it's educational and the chemistry between them is fantastic. 

Check out the episode where Pete goes to Hoi An, Vietnam to in pursuit of getting his own Roger Moore Safari Jacket made. 

THE BOND EXPERIENCE

Sticking with the James Bond theme for now is David Zaritsky from The Bond Experience. David is considered the tip of the spear when it comes to getting the scoop on all the latest James Bond attire.

Even the brands Daniel Craig has been seen wearing on set in leaked press shots have been identified and reviewed on David's YouTube channel. 


THE ULTIMATE FASHION HISTORY 

Away from the realms of James Bond, is the Ultimate Fashion History by Amanda Hallay. The videos are very informative and excellently put together in PowerPoint animated slides with Amanda's playful and charming narration. 


CARL THOMPSON 

Ok shameless plug, but at just under 10k subscribers I'm still the underdog amongst the big boys. I'll be publishing Vlogs on my latest Jewellery range soon as well as more videos about promoting mental health awareness, my take on all the latest Summer trends and lots more. 

You can also find really helpful videos on the fundamentals, like how to tie a bow tie, how to iron a shirt etc. 


BASE LONDON 

A quick shout out to Base London as they really put a lot into the production of their videos. I was lucky to be invited and do a shoot for them for a feature entitled, What to Wear on a First Date. You can catch that below. 


SARTORIAL PHIL 

This guy's number one asset is consistency. Consistently good videos every week pushing content on luxury unboxing, reviews, hauls, styling tips and more focusing on menswear, tailoring, perfume, watches and jewellery. 


 

Watch Review: Rotary Gents Stainless Steel Red / Blue GMT Henley

Today I'm going to be offering my thoughts on the Rotary Gents Stainless Steel Red / Blue GMT Henley, currently available to buy for 225 GMT. 

Some Specifications 

This robust Henley from Rotary features a 41.5mm case with a black dial and statement hands (signature paddles) and hour markers all encased with scratch resistant sapphire glass.

The GMT function is bi colour blue and red: a stunning eye-catching detail. Noted by some aficionados as the Pepsi Bezel. The Stainless Steel 3 link bracelet is secured with a deployment clasp. (More on that in a bit). It is water resistant to 100m.

What is GMT again? 

It stands for Greenwich Meantime. Many people use GMT watches to know their local time, and some other time zone that is usually not GMT.  Many GMT watches have a rotating 24 hour bezel such as this one. 

And GMT came from where? 

GMT was originally designed for travel. The origins stemmed from a collaboration between Rolex and the now dissolved Pan Am Airlines. Pan Am reportedly asked Rolex to make some watches for their pilots to tell differences in two different countries. 

What's the general vibe on this Rotary Gents Stainless Steel Red / Blue GMT Henley? 

I've spoken to people on the forums regarding this watch asking for some feedback. Which is always a dangerous thing  to do as I don't like to have any dissuasion from my instincts. General feel is that it's about right for the price point. 

Some dissatisfaction with the second hand not lining up exactly the way it should, but I've not found that to be honest. There's also been some price fluctuations between various resellers so some feel like they got their monies worth, others not. 

And my take on this watch? 

Personally I'm liking the way this watch feels on my wrist. The crown is big but doesn't dig into the back of my wrist. I think this is a perfectly functional watch to walk around the park, perhaps go traveling with. 

I wouldn't be precious with it, it's not got the beauty or guile of a Tag Heuer Aqua Racer. But it's a nice homage to say the Black Bay Tudor. (Even though the purists will tell you not to buy 'homage'). I'm not a purist, so I'm immune to such lofty pretension from hauteur’s looking to get a cushy gig at WatchTime.

I mentioned the bracelet earlier

Yes the deployment clasp is not the most fluid. I've got no problem with taking a couple of links out of the strap to get a better fit for my wrist, but the deployment clasp was a bit frustrating. 

 

What to Wear at Ascot | My Men's Style Recommendations

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With Ascot upon us (June 18th - June 22nd) now’s the time to start thinking whether you're appropriately dressed. Don't leave it until the last minute to see if those ill-fitting dark blue chinos with the spaghetti sauce stain will be eligible for entree at the Queen Anne's Enclosure. (They're not by the way). 

So you know there are certain restrictions if you've purchased tickets for the enclosures and they can be found on the Royal Ascot website.  

One thing that is forbidden in all enclosures is the allowance of fancy dress, novelty and branded or promotional clothing. 

What SHOULD I wear to Ascot? I hear you cry. 

The thing with Ascot, is that you'll feel immediately under dressed if you don't make something of an effort. It's quite different to feeling under dressed at a black tie event. Under dressing for black tie is disrespectful. Under dressing for Ascot just shows lack of imagination. 

My advice? Retire your old race day suit, or relegate to the christening suit. No one cares about christenings or what people chose to wear to them. 

NEW SHIRT TIME

I'm going to offer up the Hawkins & Shepherd Blue Soyella Duecento Shirt. It's from my latest Luxury Collection and is hand crafted using the finest cotton fabric in the world. 

The Slim Fit shirt is our best fitting shirt, for that more tailored touch.  The fit is typically slimmer through the chest, waist and hip. The collar lining is medium-soft, so you won't feel like you're on your way to a board meeting. Although you'll look impeccable and nothing can truly beat the feel of a new shirt. 

The shirt is handmade using the finest Alumo Swiss fabrics, replete with mother of pearl buttons and finished with a double button mitred cuff. If you're a shirt enthusiast then I also offer a subscription service that will entitle you to a discount.  

NEW SUIT TIME

As regular readers of my blog know I'm a huge lover of Reiss. I'd love to have my shirts in the same conversations as some of their suits and here are some of the ones I imagine would work well with the Hawkins & Shepherd Blue Soyella Duecento Shirt. 

The Reiss Grove Single Breasted suit. One of the things I love about this suit is the texture leaps out at you. You can purchase this suit and make both the trousers and the blazer interchangeable with other garments. The slim fit wool-blend suit costs 275 GBP and has a modern feel, short in length, suppressed waist, only with slightly wider lapels than a modern fit would forgive. 

The jacket costs 275 GBP whilst the matching flat front trousers costs 135 GBP. 

WHY DON'T I BUY THE REISS SHIRT ALSO?

Sure, you have the option there for you. As well as purchasing the Leicester monk strap toe caps that Reiss also recommends. However, I'm always in favour of people mixing and matching, rather than simply shopping the mannequin. A bit like when your Aunty buys you the tie and matching pocket square. Never let anyone dictate your wardrobe to you, accept me of course. 

 

The Style Icons Who Look Even Better in Their Sixties

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One of my biggest pet peeves is how fashion is perceived by the media to be a young man’s game. I respect and admire the good work done by David Evans over on Grey Fox Blog who is a constant reminder that the grey pound is often the most over looked by social media and brands alike.

Whilst that hot 20 something influencer might be blessed with the cherubic looks and the ass that won't quit, how affluent is his/her demographic. Why dress a 20 something in a Hardy Amies suit when traditional bespoke buyers are 30 something and above?

The Italian bespoke giants Brioni are one brand synonymous with ambition and being in tune with their respected clientele. Is it any wonder that their series tailoring legends feature the likes of veteran actors such Christian Slater and Pierce Brosnan?

Pierce Brosnan wore Brioni throughout his entire tenure as James Bond. He still has a great working relationship with the brand, although he has no exclusive ties to wear Brioni for media appearances. He has worn Tom Ford suits for ambassador duties and previously Spencer Hart suits.

Today I wanted to highlight some of the great plus 60 style icons that I aspire to.

Richard Gere

Every time I catch a photo of Richard Gere, I'm always fascinated by what he's wearing. I never see him take a mis-step. I've not managed to catch Father, Mother, Son yet due to technical constraints. (BBC iPlayer not available outside of the UK). But his suits look impeccable. Just like he did when he broke on the scene in the 80's in American Gigolo, transforming menswear with the unstructured jacket, softened shoulders aesthetic. No wonder he's every mums favourite.

Lino Ieluzzi 

Interestingly you won't find Lino's age anywhere online. But he is the owner of the haberdashery 'Al Bazar di Lino Ieluzzi', Milaon in which he has been working since the 1970s. Symbolically he is the tip of the spear when it comes to how a seasoned gentleman should dress. As interest in menswear spiked Ieluzzi has become more and more famous among men's style enthusiasts.

Jeff Goldblum 

It's almost as if he was waiting for this moment to arrive. To think, ironically, for his breakthrough and iconic performance in the movie The Fly, Jeff was largely bare chested. In Jurassic Park he brought the biker jacket back to its rightful home of academia rebel. Now his career shelf is awash, neigh, littered with style icon awards.

An era-encapsulating actor who can pull off a high number of audacious outfits from flower print Prada shirts to velvet teal Yves Saint Laurent tuxedos.

William Defoe 

I've long admired William Defoe's dedication to independent movies. He will often counter his thirst for playing parochial roles in low budget dramas, by making blockbusters. Some disposable, others hang around. Think of the much maligned Speed 2: versus Scorsese's arthouse miss, The Last Temptation of Christ.

However, his style is aspirational. Always has been but moreover, since marrying into an Italian family he has doubtlessly been sculpted into a style icon that transcends generations. I know he did a catwalk for Prada, and is a keen proponent of Ralph Lauren. Unsure of his preferred tailor.

Sting

From the late 70's in the height of pinstripes and wide lapels, to the touch-to-fit era of the 80's, Sting has always managed to keep on top of style trends whilst maintaining a classic demure edge.

He scrubs up well to red carpets, whilst easily switching to bearded Shoreditch hipster. Effortlessly. He has it all really. A great physique, a great style, not really known for being a trend setter but I hope I can be as versatile in my wardrobe when I hit 60 as Sting clearly is.

 

Style Icons in Their 50's

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Why should anyone in their 50's dress any different to someone in their 30's? In truth they shouldn't. Although there is no denying that your body undergoes fundamental transformations the older you get. Your carriage will naturally increase, your relaxed posture will dip incrementally, your seat will broaden. (Your arse will get fat). Your skin tone and hair will alter so some colour palettes may no longer complement you.

I've taken a look at some style icons in their 50's whom I think do a bang up job of ensuring their style is classic, timeless and aspirational.

GEORGE CLOONEY 

George is an obvious 50's style icon. He has an immortal-ness aura because he's had grey hair for the past 30 years. A neat trick he's stolen off Phillip Schofield; Look old early, look young late.

George has an affinity for Armani. He got married in an Armani Cashmere suit and looks the business. One of the films that is rarely spoken about is The American. The off the rail Ermenegildo Zegna suits. The crease resistant suits are actually staple pieces for wanderlust folk. You can find out more about that here.

COLIN FIRTH 

I think every man wishes they look as good as Colin Firth when they reach 58. I mean son of a gun, why isn't he out there banging cocktail waitresses and getting chucked out of Chiltern Firehouse for rowdy behaviour every other week?

Despite getting the brogues and oxfords, laces in, laces out rule back to front in The Kingsman, Colin Firth is no novice when it comes to style. Even before Tom Ford cemented his place as the sartorial obsessive for his directorial debut, A Single Man.

Personally for me he is the iconoclast for eyewear. His thick chunky black rim glasses are real statement pieces. Very tricky to pull off this look without sliding into Harry Hill caricature. For A Single Man he wore Tom Ford of course. For Kingsman: The Secret Service he and Taran Egerton wore Cutler and Gross. I believe Colin Firth also wears Rayban outside of films.

GRAHAM NORTON

I'd love to know who makes his suits. He might be a wild pick but Graham Norton has some amazingly crafted and unique looking suits. Some things Google just don't want to help you with. In 2003 he was voted worst dressed male in a poll by GQ. Nice work GQ? 

In an interview in 2009 he confessed to buying suits off the peg in shops. Cut smash 10 years on he's clearly had a stylist give him some positive direction.

Thanks to an article in the New York Times I can tell you he has a penchant for brands such as Thorsun (known for swimwear and flamboyant printed shirts) and Citizens of Humanity, renowned for their high end cutting edge denim. 

SIMON PEGG

Ok so Simon Pegg is 49, I checked. But he looks 50 God dammit and anyone that is 49 doesn't think they're in their 40's. 

Simon has a great casual game. It's almost run symbiotically with his career, both ascending in parallel with age. His green opal leather jacket from Star Trek 3 he wore to most of the press junkets. Looked fantastic. 

He's got a very punk/indie streak in him. His overall persona is affable, approachable and I think he tries counter that sometimes with leather jackets as a reminder that he's not the guy next door. He looks like the guy next door. Imagine him in Superdry Tee's and Casual sweats. Simon has to burn extra calories to distinguish himself. Hey we can't all look like Tom Cruise in our 50's. Some of us don't even look like Tom Cruise in our 30's. 

That's all I have time for today.

Articles that have helped me research these plus 50 style icons found below.  

https://www.samishleather.com/product/simon-pegg-star-trek-3-leather-jacket

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/style/graham-norton-bbc-holding-abc-carpet-and-home.html

https://www.whatsontv.co.uk/eurovision/graham-norton-talks-barbie-dolls-and-gaudy-suits-202576/

https://www.mrporter.com/journal/the-interview/mr-graham-nortons-wardrobe-diaries/1476

 

 

Style Icons Who Have Nailed it in Their 40's

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Yes I'm coming for you 40's. Though I'll forever have one foot in my 20's. I'm in the embers of my youth as Frank would say, but have never felt better. I'm in better shape now than I've ever been and currently writing this under a palm tree in Whitsundays, killing an hour before I head out chase down the sunset on my paddle board. Life is good. 

Before I do I wanted to highlight the style icons in their 40's that I admire. I'll do a series of these overtime as the generation thing, how people dress as they go through the gears of life fascinates me. 

DAVID BECKHAM 

David Beckham is the gift that keeps on giving for influencers and bloggers. Annotating his different outfits can certainly kill a slow news day in fashion. He's a wonderful ambassador cum-co-owner for Kent & Curwen, a British heritage brand with now a flagship store in Covent Garden. 

He traverses the line of style and statement effortlessly. Wearing some beautifully pared down pieces that will get anyone noticed without screaming 'look at me'. Exactly the line a man in his 40's needs to know. 

CHRISTIAN BALE 

Readers of my blog might have guessed that one was coming. I love Christians red carpet game more than his casual out-of-office style. Which is about as non-descript as it gets but hey-ho. Lots of cargo pants and non-logo denim shirts from what I've seen in the press.

He is obviously on good terms with Brioni however because Christian's always immaculately turned out at black tie events. His Brioni tuxedos are styled with black silk shirts and matching black ties to emphasise his mysterious quality. 

He is after all Bruce Wayne still in my eyes. He is an enigma of an actor taking on crazy roles for independent movies like The Machinist. That film was bananas. 

JUDE LAW

The thing I love about Jude Law is that he has a natural eye for a decent casual game. He has a very English style, loves his braces and his Donegal tweed. Well before he took on the role of Watson in Sherlock Holmes. 

He is a big proponent of wide brim hats are Brooklyn-esque beanies. I've read online that his style varies from Topman to Hackett London. As a resident Londoner it's no surprise that he's an indigenous shopper. 

DERMOT O'LEARY 

He has an awesome line of aftershave does Dermot, be sure to check out my blog reviewing his fragrances exclusive to M&S. He's regularly touted as being one of the UK's best dressed style icons in their 40's 

He has had some turbulence in the fashion industry. Investing and apparently losing £70k in former Savile Row tailor Spencer Hart. 

Dermot has a very unfussy style, fan of roll necks and a modern look. His lapels often suitably narrow, nipped in at the waist with a slight flair in the skirt. Very Doug Hayward of the late 70's. 

SADIQ KHAN 

If it's ever been possible to completely dislocate ones feelings of a person; their political agenda from their personal style, Sadiq Khan is that man. 

Seemingly out-of-office during the Climate protests. Knife crime at a record high. Cross Rail not delivered and the infrastructure for transportation has been somewhat wanting in London of late. All of which I can't hold Sadiq personally accountable for, but I just don't know what the man is doing other than looking swathe in his blue suits. 

He makes off the peg Zara (reportedly his go-to) look like tailor made costumiers. Sadiq dresses perfectly for a man in his late forties. His height is also a factor. He has a diminutive body (carriage) so low rise trousers work well.

High rise with inverted pleats would distort his frame. His shirts fit snug but not sprayed on. Never a tie so I think he wants to relate to the man on the street. He looks like he's about to roll his sleeves up and get stuck in. If only he would.  

 

 

Best Dressed Men in Their 30's

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What can you expect in your thirties that never happened in your twenties? You appreciate fully the unbridled sensation of dressing in a crisp white shirt. You realise you knew nothing in your twenties. The importance of being grateful. That sleep is precious and a decent mattress is essential. That sugar is less forgiving. Etc.

I'm sure I could do an entire blog. But one thing that I've paid attention to more in my thirties is not only how I dress, but the people around me dress. It really is something you never turn off. I even watch films and am taken out of the movie entirely if I can't hack if the lead male is wearing an ill-fitting suit.

Anyway, I'm going to be highlighting some gentlemen around me within my age bracket whose style speaks to me. I'll be starting by looking at men in their 30's.

RICHARD BIEDUL 

Richard has an impeccable style. Has modelled for Canali, New & Lingwood, Hemingsworth La Perla and Chester Barrie so far. He's also done two collaboration with Stacey Wood over at King & Tuckfield.

A very rakish, classic look. Reminds me of Vincent Cassel and although his style is regal, he has a rebellious streak with his smoking and tattoo's. He's done great things for British Fashion and is incredibly approachable, sweet and unassuming.

DAVID GANDY

If you stare long and deep enough into David Gandy's eyes, you'll be transported to a magical world where you ... wait sorry .. another story, another time.

David has little need for an introduction. He is regarded as the first male supermodel. Perhaps gaining an international recognition when he modelled for Paul Smith in the London Olympics 2012. His face and frame somehow tower majestically on every billboard overlooking the A40 on my way into Marylebone. 

Yet what I love about David most is his lack of fashion elitism. He never comments on trends he doesn't like. I don't think he even judges people on their fashion tastes. Just cracks on with his own wonderful style and manner. God love him. 

LEWIS HAMILTON 

He's one cool cat out of the cockpit is Lewis. His legendary fashion 'tastemaker selective' often gets him into the arbitrary GQ and Esquire best dressed men listicles. He's forged great relationships with both Versace and Dolce & Gabanna over the years. However, his first collaboration of note has been under the Tommy Hilfiger label. The collection of athleisure is typical flamboyant Lewis. Vibrant and unabashed. Youthful and slim to skinny fit distressed denim. 

RICHARD MADDEN 

Madly tipped to be the next Omega brand ambassador, Richard has had a meteoric rise to fame since his appearance in The Bodyguard. His frame is not dissimilar to mine and compliments the modern tailored look. Slim lapels, nipped in at the waist. He reminds me of Orlando Bloom but with more promise. He looks too young to be in a suit night and day. As with men in their thirties you can tell when they'd rather be in a tee shirt jeans. A leather biker jacket is more becoming Richard than a Sexton lapel-esque Tuxedo. 

EDDIE REDMAYNE 

I've always thought Eddie had a great unfussy style. One of these cats that’s got effortless style. I remember hearing an interview with Chad McQueen when quizzed about his father’s style. He said 'I never found his Dad look twice in the mirror.' Meaning he'd throw something on and walk out the door. I have a feeling Eddie has a similar vibe. He's done some work for Burberry in the past. But he's due a decent movie. Nothing I'd go watch in the past 5 years. 

 

Mens Fashion & Style Icons From the 1920’s – 1930’s

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Between hitting the pads, swinging idly in the hammocks on Whitsunday Island, I've had plenty of time to catch up on some fashion history. As many of you already know my style inspiration for Hawkins & Shepherd shirts is heavily themed around the pin collar shirts that were massively in vogue in the 1920's to 30's.

I've made a tonne of research notes and stumbled across some devilishly handsome gentlemen that were really stood out from that era. I wanted to share some of those notes with you today.

Robert Montgomery

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Robert Montgomery was an American film and television actor, director, and producer. I've included an MGM still and to quote sartorial writer James Sherwood; I 'Love a man who can wear white flannel and a cravat with conviction.'

According to IMDB, in 1935, he became President of the Screen Actors Guild. His stay with MGM lasted 16 years, and was only interrupted by WWII when he joined the navy. He saw action in both Europe and the Pacific.

You'll notice if you Google Robert Montgomery that he wore a lot of suits, with heavy cloth as was typical of the time. But immaculate fit, incredibly suave. He was clearly a man who dressed with the plenty of intent.

Marlene Dietrich 

They're not all going to be dudes in this article. It would be utterly remiss of me not to point out the fine splendour of Marlene Dietrich, regarded as the original Flapper. I've taken notes from the wonderful book by Christopher Laverty called Fashion in Film, a derivative from his excellent blog Clothes on Film.

He talks about the costumier Travis Banton who made the suit for Marlene Dietrich's first Hollywood film entitled, Morocco. 

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'Banton eschewed the era's (1920's - 30's) more obvious glamour to craft a controversial indelible image in the history of cinema. Dietrich plays a nightclub singer Amy Jolly, seen for only the second time wearing white-tie formal attire for men: black tailcoat, black trousers, white wing-collar shirt, white dress waistcoat  with white bow tie, white silk pocket square and black top hat.'

I strongly recommend you to all look as closely at the trends in women’s styles as well as men. When I write articles themed around menswear trends, I've always got half an eye on what the women are up to. Especially in this rejuvenated, androgynous-shapeless, gender fluid fashion era, it's a mistake to think that one does not reflect nor inspire the other.

FURTHER NOTES

Whilst trawling through the glorious 'A History of Fashion' by J.Anderson Black and Madge Garland I thought this was worthy of note.

'The most important item of the new style was the width of the grey flannel trousers, or 'Oxford bags' as these large garments were called since they had been launched by some under graduates of Oxford University'.

Clark Gable

Clark Gable was very much the George Clooney of his day. Just look at the supreme collar fit on his shirt, perfectly angular for his dimpled chin.

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According to an excellent article by Vintage Dancer 'Most collars were 3 or 3.25 inches long but could extend down 5 inches. Clark Gable wore the 4.5 to 5 inch California collar in a few of his movies.'

His most recognised films are Mutiny on the Bounty, It Happened one Night and of course Gone with the Wind.

Before the Second World War would eliminate an entire clientele of Savile Row customers, the three main houses Anderson & Shepherd, Huntsman and Kilgour, French & Stanbury would have more than likely provided the suits for Gable, much like they did for Valentino, Astaire, Chaplin and Grant.

Fred Astaire

King of the White Tie and just an incredible dancer. I love the quote that Gene Kelly gave about Fred Astaire as being "the only one of today's dancers who will be remembered."

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According to linear notes in Savile Row, by James Sherwood, the earliest record of Astaire on the Row is in Anderson & Sheppard's 1923 ledger. His style has been immortalised in modern day trail blazers such as the late Tommy Nutter and his former partner Edward Sexton. 

For further reading you can catch the wonderful article by Gentleman's Gazette on the life, times and style of Fred Astaire. They go into fantastic detail about his tailcoats and reference his style ambivalences in his autobiography Astaire, Steps in Time: “At the risk of disillusionment, I must admit that I don’t like top hats, white ties and tails.”

Gary Cooper

Remarkably the long read of Gary Cooper on Wikipedia mentions very little of his personal style. By all accounts he wasn't much of a conversationalist. But his style spoke volumes. Like many of his leading men contemporaries of the time, Cooper got his suits tailored at Anderson & Sheppard. 

Post war Cooper would change allegiance to fellow Savile Row tailor Norton & Sons. His films of not would be the aforementioned Morocco, A Farewell to Arms, (he was good friends with Hemingway) and The Wedding Night.

I've found a wonderful quote on the Gary Cooper website that characterises my thoughts on the man. 'No matter what costume he put on, he looked like he owned it. The camera loved him, and so did the box office.'

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Celebs Bring Their A-Game to the Avengers Endgame Purple Carpet

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When you have ten hours at an airport to kill you can't help but fall down a few rabbit holes on the internet. With the Avengers And Game premiering in LA this week I got to see the whole thing unravel on Twitter, Instagram etc. I've developed a rather obscure fascination with celebrity style and red carpets these days. I've made some notes and might require some of your help to identify the tailors and brands. 

Anthony Mackie - Falcon

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Falcon! Anthony did his research alright. Look how cool he looks on the purple carpet with his purple knitted tie and purple check shirt. His 3 piece suit looks to have a dusting of purple in it, although the light and the carpet could be playing tricks on me. 

This is could be a Calvin Klein suit. He has been known to endorse Calvin Klein before for a shoot for Sharp Magazine. Although if I was a gambling man I'd guess this is a Brooks Brother suit. Similar to the BrooksCloud fit, deconstructed. 5 button waistcoat, bruschetta pocket and peak lapels. The fit is so good around the shoulders. Brooks Brothers also did the wardrobe for The Adjustment Bureau in which Anthony starred. 

Chris Evans - Captain America

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Cap is a big lover of Salvatore Ferragamo. He wore Ferragamo to the Oscars and arrived in China as part of the press tour for Avengers Endgame wearing an all red Ferragamo suit. 

For the premiere in Los Angeles Chris arrived dressed in a custom royal blue two-button notch suit with a slim-fit mint shirt and tie by Ferragamo. 

Chris Hemsworth 

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A real ballsy number this and not afraid to show off some silver jewellery also. Hemsworth wore a full paisley suit by Etro. The shirt is also just-off navy and his silk tie is a heavy midnight blue with still a touch of paisley print to it. 

This look required no pocket square as it would interrupt the flow of the pattern. Instead Chris has accessorised with some silver rings, a black bead bracelet and gold bezel watch. Probably by TAG Heuer as he is an ambassador. Thanks to GQ magazine for highlighting the brand. 

Robert Downey Jr - Iron Man 

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Jesus Christ talk about rabbit holes. Trying to find out who does Robert Downey Jr's suits is like swimming through custard. I gave up in the end so if anyone can help me out with that I'd love you for it. 

Robert wore a black and silver embellished 1 in 4 double breasted suit that screamed Gucci. I'm tempted to say Savile Row tailor Richard Anderson could have been the mind behind this as he's known for odd quirks in detail. Check out the jetted pocket on the right skirt, unmatched to the flap pocket on the right. 

The peak grosgrain lapels are wide enough for Sexton to raise an eyebrow, and the gold collar matches evenly with his signature eyewear. For my money he is trying too hard to stay hip with his suede ankle top biker boots. But what do I know. Bradley Cooper (right) shows him how it should be done. 

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The Christian Bale Look: Where to shop

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Christian Bale is a very interesting Style Icon. For my money he is at the apex of A-list actors and his canon of films will already leave a greater legacy than most of his contemporaries. American Psycho is one of the ballsiest art house films, now a cult classic, but could have completely derailed his career as an actor. The subject matter was too risqué for Leonardo Di Caprio who reportedly turned the role down. 

But let’s focus on Christian Bales style. Of late I've seen him adopt a very black-on-black look when it comes to the red carpet. Bespoke Brioni, black shirt, black tie and black suit. In keeping really with the aura of the man which is still something of an enigma. How perfect for The Dark Knight, to have such an illusory appeal. For my money he'd make a great James Bond, still. But The James Bond producers typically opt for a calibre of actor who is still a relative up and comer. Bale is too established to cut the figure of Bond now. 

Sorry I was talking about his wardrobe. In this article I'm going to give you some alternatives to the Christian Bale look, I'm not affiliated with the brands in any way. 

Bale has a very casual, almost schlubby look when off screen. This Navy Harrington over navy tee and straight denim is very much an incognito look for Bale. He is not looking to stand out or grab attention. I've picked this outfit out because the fit is still fantastic. Not every outfit has to scream 'look at me'. 

I've pulled a close alternative Navy Bomber jacket from RRD that has a very fitted silhouette.

Continuing along with the Christian Bale casual look you'll notice that even his casual style has little time for ostentatious logos or designs. This black denim shirt has been worn in. The collars are slightly dog-earred and the colour has drained. 

However, I know from experience that you should be reluctant to ever wash your denim shirts. The Lee Western denim shirt might have a dual patch pocket instead of Bale's singular breast pocket, but you'll still achieve a similar look. 

The Cargo pants, or cargo trousers as we call them feel very American on Bale. He probably feels more at home in his casual attire. I get the feeling if he didn't have to scrub up for roles that demanded a shave, he would be living night and day in cargo pants. 

You can find dirt cheap cargo trousers online. H&M, Mountain Warehouse all do them for £20 ish. I quite like the cut of the Jack Jones Cargo pants and you can shop for those here

I doubt Bale feels comfortable modelling clothes for modelling sake. I'm sure he'd much rather be doing push ups somewhere. But he's wearing a very deluxe black Salvatore Ferragamo Knit jumper for this shoot. 

I'm going to recommend something else other than a £10 knit from H&M. By the way, if we really want to do something about fast fashion maybe search engines can do something else other than throw up H&M or ASOS stuff that you can buy for less than a Soya Cappuccino. 

Anyway, check out my friends down at King & Tuckfield. They have some knits that are sustainable and deluxe. One is currently half price. 

The American Psycho raincoat jacket. Yes, one of the most famous coats in the history of cinema. I know for a fact that Rains in Coal Drops Yard near Kings Cross had a limited edition run of these. 

They do a metallic, silver equivalent on their site so I'm presuming the transparent jacket may have sold out. Perhaps it was never listed and was in-store only. I'd certainly give them a call and ask if this is the exact jacket you want. 

The Tom Hardy Lookbook & Where to Shop: Get the Tom Hardy look

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The Tom Hardy style is a real bar-setter for anyone aspiring to build their wardrobe. I've been spending a lot time scrapbooking, assembling mood boards for various designs and projects and thought I'd put together some of the Tom Hardy highlights.

The comparison clothing are just suggestions. They are not replicas or screen accurate. I'm also not affiliated or sponsored by any of the brands.

Tom Hardy Dunkirk Farrier Shearling Bomber Leather Jacket

Remember seeing this beauty in the iMax but getting wildly distracted. I kept thinking I need to track this jacket down the minute I get home. I think sadly, so did every other man because it became such a saturated trend after that I gave it a trend-miss.

However, a few years on it could be the time to revive the shearling bomber leather Jacket. If you're not in the market to wear real shearling then a company called American Leather Jacket has modelled a replica which is now reduced.

Tom Hardy Elusive Brown Jacket

I'm struggling to find this cool brown jacket anywhere. It looks like something that Belstaff might do but the fabrics not leather. I've put an interesting comparison of a jacket by Feather Skin.

I know the design is way off but I like the vibe. The jacket Tom is wearing could be Dunhill as I know Tom likes a bit of Dunhill. I have located the tee shirt though. Check out Dead Legacy they have some playful designs.

Tom Hardy Check Shirts

The Check shirt, lumber jack look is a signature look of the casual Tom Hardy. He'll wear these kind of shirts in films and in his free time. I've struggled to get a close one on this purple/grey casual shirt.

I used to own one similar by Scotch & Soda. Whilst this looks like Scotch & Soda it's not available on their site. I've cast a broad net and found some close-ish comparisons on ASOS. Brands like Jack Jones, River Island and Original Penguin will offer close alternatives for check shirts.

Tom Hardy Suit & Shirt Style

Despite my reservations about this film you can't ignore that Tom Hardy was fantastic in it. The costume design by Caroline Harris was also quite ravishing in places. I listened to an interview with Soho Tailor Mark Powell on the From Tailors With Love podcast who was quite indifferent to it, but I'm a fan.

Sartorially the two Kray brothers, (both played by Tom Hardy are distinguished with Ronnie wearing Double breasted and Reggie wearing single breasted suit jackets. Simple and effective.

The suits were made from wool sourced from northern mills. Christopher Ecclestone, played the character 'Leonard 'Nipper' Read' and wore an old 50's original suit from Hardy Amies. 

The tab collar shirts shirts I imagine were tailored and can be found via Hawkins & Shepherd. Those crisp white shirts have been a source of inspiration for me when designing my own shirts. Check out my range of formal white shirts that are a homage to the classic styles of 50's and 60's tailoring. 

Tom Hardy White Henley T-Shirt

So this one we know is from Dunhill. I'm more in love with the ensemble than I am with just one piece of clothing. The beaded necklaces is certainly the sort of thing I've been paying closely recently with the impending launch of my own brand. 

But the beard, the style, it all comes together for me here. Also notice the henley is textured so it lifts up. There is something palpable about this top. Or maybe it's just because there is a body of tepid steel lurking beneath. 

Of course you can pick these Henley White tee's up for under £10 at H&M. 

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Best London Street Style Photographers to Follow on Instagram

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Sadly it's an occupational hazard that means I have to be in 99% of the photos on my Instagram feed, ruining the view as some might say.

Trust me, I'm much more comfortable behind the camera, but pictures of sunsets minus yours truly, doesn't keep the lights on at the Thompson household.

That said I'm a huge advocate of street photography. I've highlighted some of my favourite London Street Photographers and recommend you give them a follow on Instagram and tell them I sent you.

OMNISTYLE

Fronted by my good pal Andrew Barber. Andrew is one of London's best street photographers and has accompanied me on many shoots. He really captures the essence of people when he looks their way.

Somehow he manages to distil every moment down to its finest millisecond. Always a pleasure and a privilege to be in this gentleman's company.

DAVID NYANZI                                             

London based photographer David has an uncanny knack of capturing the most ostentatious and elaborate outfits on the London streets today.

It holds a great balance between staged and street photography. I often go to David's page to get inspiration for poses, angles and... well I was going to say outfits but a lot of those are just a bit too bananas for me.

NIKON STREET STYLE

Ran by my good friend Pete Brooker over at Human Research. He takes pictures of strangers, without permission he adds. Apparently one of the first person he asked if it was ok to take their picture turned him down flat. Today he tells me he can't face that level of rejection so has never asked permission since.

GARCON JON

No London Street Photographer's list would be complete without the addition of Garcon Jon, AKA Jonathan Daniel Price.

I've always wanted to have a middle name. Makes you sound so much more dignified when people read it aloud.

Daniel is quite experimental with his lighting. Often seeking the less obvious angles. Such as car wing mirror reflections or interrupted spaces.

THE1HARRIS

AKA Richard Harris. Has a very unique sense for capturing disturbed beauty. Almost like a magnet for identifying ones solitude.

His captions are also enchanting, lyrical, thoughtful and I'm just in love with this guy. His feed is a joy to get lost in.

Let me know if you have any other recommendations in the comment box below. Even if it's your own Instagram handle I'm always on the lookout for London Street photographers for personal paid lifestyle shoots.